Christianity After Auschwitz

Christianity After Auschwitz PDF Author: Paul R. Carlson, EdD
Publisher: Xlibris Corporation
ISBN: 1453582622
Category : Religion
Languages : en
Pages :

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Book Description
There is an old Jewish adage that pretty much sums up Israel’s experience among the nations for the last 2,000 years. “Scratch a gentile,” the saying goes, “and you’re sure to find an anti-Semite.” That notion is given credence by the fact that the first two millennia of the Jewish-Christian encounter culminated in the systematic slaughter of six-million Jews in the heart of Christendom. But Dr. Paul R. Carlson, author of Christianity After Auschwitz, is cautiously optimistic that the dawn of this new millennium may lead to Jewish-Christian amity as the Church faces up to its past sins and seeks to work with the Synagogue against those demonic forces which threaten civilization itself. However, as Carlson illustrates, the genocidal germ that gave birth to Hitler’s criminal regime still flourishes among countless Christians, many of whom would passionately deny they harbor any anti-Semitic notions or sentiments. While the book is addressed primarily to Carlson’s fellow evangelicals, both Jews and Christians will discover that it provides the general reader with an overview of those critical issues which scholars alone have in the past wrestled with in the post-Holocaust Jewish-Christian encounter. At the outset, Carlson is quick to concede that the late Rabbi Joseph B. Soloveitchik, a scion of the great Chechnowa Rebbe, was certainly correct when he insisted that “Christians have never tried to penetrate the soul of the Jews. “They have read the Bible but neglected the oral tradition by which we interpret it,” he noted. “This makes a different Bible altogether. For example, says Rav Soloveitchik: “To equate Judaism with legalism the way Christian theologians are prone to do is like equating mathematics with a compilation of mathematical equations.” By the same token, old stereotypes die hard. “The Jew has been pictured as the arch-capitalist and the arch-Bolshevik and chastised for being both, whipsawed by contending forces,” says Nathan C. Belth. “The Soviet authorities [saw] Jews as a threat to the state, and Alexander Solzhenitsyn, who castigate[d] Soviet terror, sees Jews as libertarians who brought on socialism, after, of course, rejecting Christ.” Since time-immemorial, anti-Semites have also portrayed the Jew as the greedy, shady businessman or banker. But they conveniently forget stories such as that of Haym Salomon [1740-1785], the Jewish broker whose financial aid staved off starvation and desertion among American troops during our War for Independence. At one critical point, Robert Morris, the American financier and statesman, sent a messenger to alert Haym Salomon of the plight of the cash-strapped Colonial forces. The man brought the news to Salomon while he was attending Yom Kippur services at Mikveh Israel Synagogue in Philadelphia. The congregation was shocked at the intrusion on the holiest day of the Jewish year; but Haym Salomon quietly informed the messenger: “Tell Mr. Morris our country’s appeal will not be in vain.” But that old canard about Jews and their money remains grist for the anti-Semite’s mill. By the same token, Jews have not been entirely blameless when it comes to their own stereotypes of Christians, particularly evangelicals. Nathan Perlmutter confessed as much during his tenure as national director of the Anti-Defamation League (ADL) of B’nai B’rith. “Our image of the fundamentalist and the evangelical is a kind of collage assembled out of bits and pieces from Theodore Dreiser, Sinclair Lewis and Erskine Caldwell . . . ,” he admitted. “Even after all this time memories of the great swarm of sex-ridden, Bible-thumping caricatures continue to exert a pervasive power.” But evangelicals would be among the first to admit that Jews have come a long way since the days of the infamous Toledot Yeshu, or Life of Jesus, which depicted the Galilean in scandalous terms. Indeed, the Israeli author Shalom Ben-Chorin is representative of those Jewish intellectuals who now believe that “it is time for Jesus to come home again.” Meanwhile, few Christians realize just how vulnerable many Jews feel in what they perceive to be “Christian America.” That perception is heightened by the 1992 American Jewish Year Book finding that “roughly 12 percent of Americans of Jewish heritage are now Christians.” “There is another way of looking at what I have called a disaster in the making,” says former US Assistant Secretary of State Elliott Abrams, author of Faith or Fear: How Jews Can Survive in a Christian America “Of the 6.8 million people who are Jews or of Jewish descent, 1.1 million say they have no religion and 1.3 million have joined another religion, adding up to 2.4 million,” Abrams observes. “This means that one-third of the people in America of Jewish ethnic origin no longer report Judaism as their current religion (Abrams italics). Such statistics illustrate why Jewish leaders unanimously condemn those Christian missionary agencies which specifically target Jews for conversion. They have been particularly incensed by one recent evangelical effort, known as Peace 2000, which aimed to convert every Jew in Israel to Christianity by the dawn of the new millennium. “Centuries of martyrdom are the price which the Jewish people has paid for survival,” says Brandeis scholar Marshall Sklare. “And the apostate, at one stroke, makes a mockery of Jewish history. “But if the convert is contemptible in Jewish eyes,” Sklare adds, “the missionary — all the more, the missionary of Jewish descent -- is seen as pernicious, for he forces the Jew to relive the history of his martyrdom, all the while pressing the claim that in approaching the Jew he does so out of love. “What kind of love is it, Jews wonder, that would deprive a man of his heritage,” Sklare asks. “Furthermore, given the history of Christian treatment of the Jews, would it not seem time at last to recognize that the Jew has paid his dues and earned the right to be protected from obliteration by Christian love as well as destruction by Christian hate?” The distinguished Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel was even more pointed about the matter. “I had rather enter Auschwitz,” he once remarked, “than be an object of conversion.” All of this leads to the opening chapter of Christianity After Auschwitz, which introduces Christians to Emil Fackenheim’s “Eleventh Commandment” — or 614th Mitzvoth — which decrees that Jews are not permitted to grant Hitler any posthumous victories through intermarriage, assimilation, or conversion to a faith not their own. In a word, they are commanded to remain Jews. By the same token, Jewish scholars are quick to recognize that any “open and honest” dialogue will at some point involve a frank discussion of the similarities and differences between the Jewish and Christian perception[s] of the Messianic hope. With that understanding, the second chapter deals with the remarkable career of the late Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson, the seventh and last Grand Rebbe of the Chabad Lubavitch Hasidim. Many of his talmidim, or disciples, believe he will ultimately be revealed as King-Messiah. His life and work are considered within the context of that of Jesus of Nazareth, as well as those of several pseudo-messiahs who have troubled Israel down through the centuries The author then makes it clear that Jesus himsel

Christianity After Auschwitz

Christianity After Auschwitz PDF Author: Paul R. Carlson, EdD
Publisher: Xlibris Corporation
ISBN: 1453582622
Category : Religion
Languages : en
Pages :

Get Book

Book Description
There is an old Jewish adage that pretty much sums up Israel’s experience among the nations for the last 2,000 years. “Scratch a gentile,” the saying goes, “and you’re sure to find an anti-Semite.” That notion is given credence by the fact that the first two millennia of the Jewish-Christian encounter culminated in the systematic slaughter of six-million Jews in the heart of Christendom. But Dr. Paul R. Carlson, author of Christianity After Auschwitz, is cautiously optimistic that the dawn of this new millennium may lead to Jewish-Christian amity as the Church faces up to its past sins and seeks to work with the Synagogue against those demonic forces which threaten civilization itself. However, as Carlson illustrates, the genocidal germ that gave birth to Hitler’s criminal regime still flourishes among countless Christians, many of whom would passionately deny they harbor any anti-Semitic notions or sentiments. While the book is addressed primarily to Carlson’s fellow evangelicals, both Jews and Christians will discover that it provides the general reader with an overview of those critical issues which scholars alone have in the past wrestled with in the post-Holocaust Jewish-Christian encounter. At the outset, Carlson is quick to concede that the late Rabbi Joseph B. Soloveitchik, a scion of the great Chechnowa Rebbe, was certainly correct when he insisted that “Christians have never tried to penetrate the soul of the Jews. “They have read the Bible but neglected the oral tradition by which we interpret it,” he noted. “This makes a different Bible altogether. For example, says Rav Soloveitchik: “To equate Judaism with legalism the way Christian theologians are prone to do is like equating mathematics with a compilation of mathematical equations.” By the same token, old stereotypes die hard. “The Jew has been pictured as the arch-capitalist and the arch-Bolshevik and chastised for being both, whipsawed by contending forces,” says Nathan C. Belth. “The Soviet authorities [saw] Jews as a threat to the state, and Alexander Solzhenitsyn, who castigate[d] Soviet terror, sees Jews as libertarians who brought on socialism, after, of course, rejecting Christ.” Since time-immemorial, anti-Semites have also portrayed the Jew as the greedy, shady businessman or banker. But they conveniently forget stories such as that of Haym Salomon [1740-1785], the Jewish broker whose financial aid staved off starvation and desertion among American troops during our War for Independence. At one critical point, Robert Morris, the American financier and statesman, sent a messenger to alert Haym Salomon of the plight of the cash-strapped Colonial forces. The man brought the news to Salomon while he was attending Yom Kippur services at Mikveh Israel Synagogue in Philadelphia. The congregation was shocked at the intrusion on the holiest day of the Jewish year; but Haym Salomon quietly informed the messenger: “Tell Mr. Morris our country’s appeal will not be in vain.” But that old canard about Jews and their money remains grist for the anti-Semite’s mill. By the same token, Jews have not been entirely blameless when it comes to their own stereotypes of Christians, particularly evangelicals. Nathan Perlmutter confessed as much during his tenure as national director of the Anti-Defamation League (ADL) of B’nai B’rith. “Our image of the fundamentalist and the evangelical is a kind of collage assembled out of bits and pieces from Theodore Dreiser, Sinclair Lewis and Erskine Caldwell . . . ,” he admitted. “Even after all this time memories of the great swarm of sex-ridden, Bible-thumping caricatures continue to exert a pervasive power.” But evangelicals would be among the first to admit that Jews have come a long way since the days of the infamous Toledot Yeshu, or Life of Jesus, which depicted the Galilean in scandalous terms. Indeed, the Israeli author Shalom Ben-Chorin is representative of those Jewish intellectuals who now believe that “it is time for Jesus to come home again.” Meanwhile, few Christians realize just how vulnerable many Jews feel in what they perceive to be “Christian America.” That perception is heightened by the 1992 American Jewish Year Book finding that “roughly 12 percent of Americans of Jewish heritage are now Christians.” “There is another way of looking at what I have called a disaster in the making,” says former US Assistant Secretary of State Elliott Abrams, author of Faith or Fear: How Jews Can Survive in a Christian America “Of the 6.8 million people who are Jews or of Jewish descent, 1.1 million say they have no religion and 1.3 million have joined another religion, adding up to 2.4 million,” Abrams observes. “This means that one-third of the people in America of Jewish ethnic origin no longer report Judaism as their current religion (Abrams italics). Such statistics illustrate why Jewish leaders unanimously condemn those Christian missionary agencies which specifically target Jews for conversion. They have been particularly incensed by one recent evangelical effort, known as Peace 2000, which aimed to convert every Jew in Israel to Christianity by the dawn of the new millennium. “Centuries of martyrdom are the price which the Jewish people has paid for survival,” says Brandeis scholar Marshall Sklare. “And the apostate, at one stroke, makes a mockery of Jewish history. “But if the convert is contemptible in Jewish eyes,” Sklare adds, “the missionary — all the more, the missionary of Jewish descent -- is seen as pernicious, for he forces the Jew to relive the history of his martyrdom, all the while pressing the claim that in approaching the Jew he does so out of love. “What kind of love is it, Jews wonder, that would deprive a man of his heritage,” Sklare asks. “Furthermore, given the history of Christian treatment of the Jews, would it not seem time at last to recognize that the Jew has paid his dues and earned the right to be protected from obliteration by Christian love as well as destruction by Christian hate?” The distinguished Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel was even more pointed about the matter. “I had rather enter Auschwitz,” he once remarked, “than be an object of conversion.” All of this leads to the opening chapter of Christianity After Auschwitz, which introduces Christians to Emil Fackenheim’s “Eleventh Commandment” — or 614th Mitzvoth — which decrees that Jews are not permitted to grant Hitler any posthumous victories through intermarriage, assimilation, or conversion to a faith not their own. In a word, they are commanded to remain Jews. By the same token, Jewish scholars are quick to recognize that any “open and honest” dialogue will at some point involve a frank discussion of the similarities and differences between the Jewish and Christian perception[s] of the Messianic hope. With that understanding, the second chapter deals with the remarkable career of the late Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson, the seventh and last Grand Rebbe of the Chabad Lubavitch Hasidim. Many of his talmidim, or disciples, believe he will ultimately be revealed as King-Messiah. His life and work are considered within the context of that of Jesus of Nazareth, as well as those of several pseudo-messiahs who have troubled Israel down through the centuries The author then makes it clear that Jesus himsel

Anatomy of Deception: How Liberals Lie About Christianity

Anatomy of Deception: How Liberals Lie About Christianity PDF Author: Mark Jarmuth
Publisher: Lulu.com
ISBN: 1304246558
Category :
Languages : en
Pages : 281

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Book Description


Christianity

Christianity PDF Author: Philip Kennedy
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 0857737880
Category : Religion
Languages : en
Pages : 281

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Book Description
The Christian faith has the allegiance of one third of the human race. It has succeeded in influencing civilization to such a degree that we now take its existence almost for granted. Yet it might all have been so different. Christianity began with the words and deeds of an obscure village carpenter's son who died a shameful criminal's death at the hands of the Roman occupiers of his country: itself an insignificant outpost of the powerful ruling Empire. The feverish land of biblical Palestine, awash with apocalyptic expectations of deliverance from its foreign overlords, was hardly short of seers and prophets who claimed to be sent visions from God. Yet the followers of this man thought he was different: so different, in fact, that some years after his death and asserted resurrection they scandalously insisted not only that he was sent by God, but that he 'was' God. How a provincial sect, with its seemingly outrageous ideas, became first the sanctioned religion of the Roman Empire and then, over the course of 2000 years, the creed of billions of people, is the improbable story that this book tells. It is a story of freethinkers, friars, fanatics and firebrands; and of the lay people (not just the clerical or the powerful) who have made up the great mass of Christians over the centuries. Many introductions to Christianity are written by Christians, for Christians. This elegant textbook, by contrast, shows that the history of the religion, while often glorious, is not one of unimpeded progress, but something still more remarkable, flawed and human.

More Christianity

More Christianity PDF Author: Dwight Longenecker
Publisher: Ignatius Press
ISBN: 1586173421
Category : Religion
Languages : en
Pages : 282

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Book Description
No one would dare to suggest that C. S. Lewis's Mere Christianity is anything less than a brilliant explanation and defense of the Faith. But as robust, wise and ardent as it is, still it is incomplete. It begins our banquet at the table of the Lord, but doesn't take us all the way to the final course. That is what Dwight Longenecker's new book, More Christianity, does. It fills our plates with the fullness of the Christian Faith found only in the Catholic Church. Lest someone think Longenecker is presuming to piggyback or cash in on Lewis' work, or to set himself up as Lewis' successor, that is not the case. What he does--and does brilliantly--is present the doctrine of the Church with succinct explanations of topics that arise in Catholic/Protestant discussion: the Marian dogmas, the papacy, the Mass, purgatory, the communion of saints, the rosary and more. In Longenecker's skilled hands, More Christianity rounds out the meal so deliciously served up by Lewis in Mere Christianity.

AQA GCSE Religious Studies A (9-1): Christianity and Buddhism Revision Guide

AQA GCSE Religious Studies A (9-1): Christianity and Buddhism Revision Guide PDF Author: Marianne Fleming
Publisher: Oxford University Press - Children
ISBN: 0198422865
Category : Juvenile Nonfiction
Languages : en
Pages :

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Book Description
Building on the Oxford AQA GCSE Religious Studies Student Books, this Revision Guide offers a structured approach to revising for the new 9-1 exams. 1. RECAP: key content from the Student Book is condensed and re-presented in simple visual styles to make content memorable and help retention. 2. APPLY: students actively apply the content they have just revised to build the knowledge and evaluative skills needed for the exams. 3. REVIEW: regular opportunities to practice exam questions and review answers direct students to pinpoint any areas of weakness in knowledge or exam skills, identifying where they'll need to concentrate their efforts for further revision. This Revision Guide is ideal for students combining Christianity and Buddhism. With all the essential content condensed and made memorable, and plenty of exam practice, tips and annotated sample answers, students can confidently prepare for their new exams.

The Bible, Christianity, and Culture

The Bible, Christianity, and Culture PDF Author: Pavol Bargár
Publisher: Charles University in Prague, Karolinum Press
ISBN: 8024654075
Category : Religion
Languages : en
Pages : 375

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Book Description
This book originated in the Donatio Universitatis Carolinae award and research support that Professor Petr Pokorný received in 2017. It was envisioned, designed, and originally conducted as a project exploring the biblical roots of Christian culture. Experts in various theological and philosophical disciplines, both from the Czech Republic and abroad, were to probe this topic from their particular perspectives. The hoped-for output was to be a coherent collective study of the proposed topic. However, due to the unexpected passing away of Prof. Pokorný in early 2020, the project could not be executed according to the original plan. Rather than a collective monograph, therefore, the present book is a collection of essays that investigate various aspects of the Bible and Christianity in their relation to culture as a broad human phenomenon. The book is divided into two sections. While the first section focuses on particular issues in the Bible, the second addresses historical, philosophical, and cultural developments. As Petr Pokorný was actively and importantly involved in the initial stages of the project, two essays are written by him personally. The whole book, then, is dedicated in his honor.

Islam and Christianity

Islam and Christianity PDF Author: Hüseyin Hilmi Işık
Publisher: Hakikat Kitabevi
ISBN:
Category : Religion
Languages : en
Pages : 415

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Book Description
Islam that abrogated celestial religions of Judaism and Christianity along with their validity is explained first. That Qur’an-ı Karîm is word of Allah; miracles of Muhammad ׳alayhissalâm, his virtues, moral practices and habits; how to be a true Muslim; a comparison of Islam and Christianity; that Muslims are scientifically powerful; are explained next.

Conversion of Chinese Students in Korea to Evangelical Christianity

Conversion of Chinese Students in Korea to Evangelical Christianity PDF Author: Chang Seop Kang
Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers
ISBN: 1666703524
Category : Religion
Languages : en
Pages : 242

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Book Description
Currently, about 6 percent of the eighty thousand Chinese college students in Korea are Christians, certainly no small number considering their future role within the Chinese Church. In this study, Chang Seop Kang seeks to find out the factors, process, and types concerning the conversion of thirty Chinese international students. This qualitative study gives a rich picture of their conversion stories, providing many examples from their insider perspectives. The key finding connecting these stories is experiencing God. Overall, this book showcases how an inductive data analysis such as grounded theory can produce a powerful message that affirms biblical truth.

Christianity

Christianity PDF Author: Anne Jordan
Publisher: Nelson Thornes
ISBN: 9780748753208
Category : Juvenile Nonfiction
Languages : en
Pages : 116

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Book Description
GCSE RE for You: Christianity is part of the popular GCSE RE for You series. It offers a thorough introduction to each topic and tests pupils' knowledge through a range of activities and exam-style questions. The content and style motivates students and makes RE a more interesting option within schools.

After the First Urban Christians

After the First Urban Christians PDF Author: Todd D. Still
Publisher: T&T Clark
ISBN:
Category : Religion
Languages : en
Pages : 204

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Book Description
'After the First Urban Christians' introduces the groundbreaking volume 'The First Urban Christians' to a new generation of students, scholars, and even general readers.